Why Do We Say Cut The Cheese?

What does Fanny’s your aunt mean?

Often extended to include “and Fanny’s your aunt”, it is often used when issuing a set of instructions or guidelines, in order to indicate how easy the instructions are to follow.

It is the equivalent of saying: “First you follow these steps from 1 to 6, then turn this knob clockwise – and there you have it, it’s done!.

Why is it close but no cigar?

From the practice of giving cigars as prizes at carnivals in the US in the 20th century; this phrase would be said to those who failed to win a prize.

Why do we say cut the mustard?

Possibly derived from the idiom ‘to pass muster’, an expression for assembling military troops for inspection. A troop who has achieved excellent performance in, for example, a room inspection, is allowed to skip, or “cut” having to stand a formal muster or formation and go on liberty early, etc.

Why do we say Heavens to Betsy?

Origin of Heavens to Betsy The origins of this expression are unclear. It may have originated sometime between the years 1850 and 1914. Heavens to Betsy is another variation of the phrase for Heaven’s sake, which began as a euphemism for what some considered the blasphemous for God’s sake and for Christ’s sake.

What is the meaning of fart?

: to expel intestinal gas from the anus. fart. noun. Definition of fart (Entry 2 of 2) 1 often vulgar : an expulsion of intestinal gas.

Where did the expression Close but no cigar?

What’s the origin of the phrase ‘Close, but no cigar’? The phrase, and its variant ‘nice try, but no cigar’, are of US origin and date from the mid-20th century. Fairground stalls gave out cigars as prizes, and this is the most likely source, although there’s no definitive evidence to prove that.

Why is it called Dressed to the nines?

One theory is that it comes from the name of the 99th Wiltshire Regiment, known as the Nines, which was renowned for its smart appearance. Why it should have been to the nines rather than to the eights, to the sevens, etc. … remains unclear.

Why do we say fit as a fiddle?

The violin was picked out as the exemplar because of the alliteration of fit and fiddle, and because the violin is a beautifully shaped instrument producing a very particular sound. … But then fit came to mean ‘in good physical shape’ and so fit as a fiddle came to mean ‘in good condition physically’.

Where does the phrase a cut above come from?

“A cut above” dates from the eighteenth century and literally means the quality of the cutting or fashioning of a person’s clothing. The superior appearance or station in life of someone with a good tailor or milliner is obvious when compared with a common man or woman, making them a “cut above” the ordinary.

Where did the phrase cut the cheese come from?

This idiom references the foul smell emitted by some cheeses, many of which have a rind that keep the odor in. Once the rind is pierced, as in the case of slicing it, the smell is released.

What does cut the cheese slang mean?

(US, idiomatic, euphemistic, slang) To flatulate. Hey, who cut the cheese?

Who cut the cheese game?

Slice up the cheese to move down the board. But beware, you may find a surprise sound inside. The first person to reach finish 3 times is the winner! Kids love silly games, so what would make them happier than a game thats just one big fart joke!

What does cut the Chase mean?

to get to the point without wasting time”Cut to the chase” is a phrase that means to get to the point without wasting time. The saying originated from early film studios’ silent films. It was a favorite of, and thought to have been coined by, Hal Roach Sr.

Why Bob’s your uncle meaning?

“Bob’s your uncle” is a phrase commonly used in Ireland, United Kingdom and Commonwealth countries that means “and there it is” or “and there you have it”. Typically, someone says it to conclude a set of simple instructions or when a result is reached.

Does ring a bell meaning?

Arouse an indistinct memory, remind one of something, as in That name rings a bell—I think I’ve met him.

What does the saying for Pete’s sake mean?

Interjection. for Pete’s sake. (idiomatic, euphemistic) Used to expresses frustration, exasperation, annoyance. For Pete’s sake, get off the computer! You’ve been on there for ages!

Why do we say Bobs your uncle?

In 1887, British Prime Minister Robert Gascoyne-Cecil appointed his nephew Arthur James Balfour as Minister for Ireland. The phrase ‘Bob’s your uncle’ was coined when Arthur referred to the Prime Minister as ‘Uncle Bob’. Apparently, it’s very simple to become a minister when Bob’s your uncle!

What is a slap on the wrist?

a small punishment when a more severe punishment is deserved: They rob someone on the street and they get a slap on the wrist – thirty days in jail.