Question: Is The Miller’S Tale A Poem?

What does the Miller’s tale say about the Miller?

We are told that he is a powerful and strong man, “he was of brawn, and eek of bones” (l.

546).

He is described as a man who can break down doors with his head and is a “knotty fellow.” Aside from his brute strength, the Miller is described as a man with a “berd as any sowe or fox was reed” (l.

551)..

What does the Miller say his tale will do to the Knight’s Tale?

The host asks the monk to tell the next tale. … What does the Miller say his tale will do to the Knight’s tale? The Miller says his tale will requite (dunk) the Knight’s tale.

Where is the merchant’s tale set?

LombardyThe main character, Januarie (or January), a senex amans, is a 60-year-old knight from the town of Pavia, in Lombardy.

What is the moral of the Miller’s tale?

The moral of this tale is that people do not get what they deserve. John is a kind-hearted, if rather stupid, man who cherishes his wife and is in awe of Nicholas’ learning, and he winds up a laughing-stock with a broken arm.

Why does the Miller tell his tale?

But the Miller, who is very drunk, announces that he will tell a story about a carpenter. … Chaucer then warns the reader that this tale might be a bit vulgar, but he must tell all the stories because a prize is at stake. Thus, the Miller begins his tale.

What happened in the Miller’s tale?

The Miller’s Tale, one of the 24 stories in The Canterbury Tales by Geoffrey Chaucer. … This bawdy story of lust and revenge is told by a drunken, churlish Miller. Alison, the young wife of a carpenter, takes their boarder Nicholas as her lover.

How is the Miller’s tale a satire?

Chaucer set up these characters as the poke fun of lower class society. … The purpose of satire in the Miller’s Tale was for Chaucer to be able to better reveal his perspective on the lower-class society. Chaucer is obviously ridiculing the lower-class people for their earthy and bodily behaviors.

Is the merchant’s tale a poem?

The Poem. … “The Merchant’s Tale” is primarily among the latter, though it contains elements of poetry in the genres of courtly romance and homily as well. Like most of The Canterbury Tales, “The Merchant’s Tale” is preceded by a prologue that links it to the outer frame of the story of the pilgrims on their journey.

How does the Millers tale end?

The love triangle between Nicholas, Absolon, and Alisoun reaches its climax, and the Miller’s belief that a great flood is coming seems to be vindicated, causing him to cut the rope that’s attaching him to the ceiling, which brings him crashing to the floor.

Why is the Miller mad at the Reeve?

“The Reeve’s Tale” is an attempt by the Reeve to “quite,” or answer, “The Miller’s Tale.” The Reeve is angry because the Miller has just told a story in which a carpenter is humiliated by his wife and her lover. … The similarity between the two tales may be evidence of a source relationship between them.

Who is the merchant in the Canterbury Tales?

We know the merchant is the fashionista of the group because he’s wearing a cloak of “motley” (variegated, colorful pattern), a Flemish beaver hat, and has a forked beard, all of which were current fashions at this time period.

What details make the Miller’s Tale realistic?

Some details that make the tale seem realistic are: setting in Oxford and Oseney; business success of the carpenter; and the poor scholar.

What is the best tale in The Canterbury Tales?

The Best Canterbury Tales Everyone Should ReadThe Miller’s Tale.The Nun’s Priest’s Tale.The Knight’s Tale.The Merchant’s Tale.The Reeve’s Tale.The Wife of Bath’s Tale.The Friar’s Tale.The Tale of Sir Thopas.More items…•

Who tells the Miller’s tale?

“The Miller’s Tale” (Middle English: The Milleres Tale) is the second of Geoffrey Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales (1380s–1390s), told by the drunken miller Robin to “quite” (a Middle English term meaning requite or pay back, in both good and negative ways) “The Knight’s Tale”.

What does Fabliau mean?

Fabliau, plural fabliaux, a short metrical tale made popular in medieval France by the jongleurs, or professional storytellers. Fabliaux were characterized by vivid detail and realistic observation and were usually comic, coarse, and often cynical, especially in their treatment of women. Fabliau. French literature.

What type of tale is the Miller’s tale?

“The Miller’s Tale” is also about a love triangle, but it’s far from highbrow. Instead, “The Miller’s Tale” comes from the genre called fabliau. Fabliaux were bawdy stories, usually dealing with adulterous liaisons.